Housing Resource Directory


HUD HOUSING PROGRAMS

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

Home Investment Partnerships (HOME) Program

The HOME program expands the supply of decent, affordable housing for low‑ and very low-income families; builds state and local capacity to design and carry out affordable housing programs; provides financial and technical assistance to participating jurisdictions; and strengthens partnerships among all levels of government and the private sector in the development of affordable housing.


Montana’s Statewide HOME Program

The Montana Department of Commerce (MDOC) Housing Division administers the statewide HOME program. This program allows tenant-based rental assistance; first time home buyers assistance; property acquisition; new construction; homeowner rehabilitation; building rehabilitation; site improvements; and other activities for developing non-luxury housing. All HOME funds assist families with incomes at or below 80% area median income.

All Montana cities and towns (except Billings, Great Falls, and Missoula, which are entitlement cities with their own funding and programs), counties, contiguous units of local government, public housing authorities (PHAs), and MDOC-certified community housing development organizations (CHDOs) are eligible to apply for HOME funds. A minimum of 15% of HOME funds is set-aside for CHDOs doing CHDO-eligible activities (development, ownership, and sponsorship of housing projects) within their jurisdiction.

In 2006, the Montana HOME Program instituted a program to allocate a portion of its annual allocation of funds on a statewide basis to entities conducting homebuyer assistance (HBA) and homeowner rehabilitation (HR) programs. Cities, counties, PHAs, and CHDOs submit a qualification package rather than an application. There is no deadline, application, or scoring for programs providing HBA or HR. The HOME Program allocated approximately 25% of its HUD funding to the Single Family Noncompetitive Program.

The remaining HOME allocation funds construction, acquisition and/or rehabilitation of rental property; development of new housing for homeownership. The development of new housing for homeownership; or rehabilitation of owner-occupied housing, involves projects requiring more than 180 days to complete. The funds are allocated under the normal competitive grant application process and follow the current Montana HOME Investment Partnerships Program Application Guidelines.

An individual may not apply directly to the HOME program; however, individual households are the ultimate recipients of all HOME grant funds through the eligible applicants.

Contact: Jennifer Olson, Bureau Chief, Grants Bureau, Community Development Division, Montana Department of Commerce. Phone: 406.841.2770, Fax: 406.841.2771 www.comdev.mt.gov


City of Billings HOME Program

The City of Billings HOME and CDBG program funds are used to achieve common goals and objectives of the city’s Consolidated Plan. The Billings CDBG and HOME program funds are used to promote fair housing and affordable housing citywide; to preserve and revitalize the city's existing affordable housing stock; and to improve and revitalize neighborhoods where existing affordable housing stock is located. HOME program funds are specifically used for first-time homebuyer activities and to help finance new affordable housing projects. CDBG program funds are also used to support new housing activities, but primarily are used for activities that update and improve the community's existing affordable housing stock.

The core programs for the City of Billings are assist low/moderate income households within the city limits and include: 1) First Time Homebuyers which assists households at or below 80% area median income with down payment and closing cost assistance to purchase a home; 2) Affordable Housing which assists in the development of new affordable housing for low and very low income households; 3) Housing Rehabilitation which is a no interest deferred loan for substantial rehab of affordable housing stock for low/moderate income homeowner occupied residents; 4) Minor Home Repair which is for emergency repairs of stick built homes as well as repairs for mobile homes 30 years old or newer; 5) Exterior Paint Program; and 6) Special Assessment Grants to assist low and very low income households with curb, gutter and sidewalk replacement generated through a special improvement district for work completed by the City of Billings.

In addition, the City of Billings works with community partners, both non-profit and for-profit organizations, to improve the living conditions of low and very low income individuals. Programs supported in the past include: Food Bank of Billings, South Side Senior Center, Yellowstone County Council on Aging, Big Sky Senior Services, Tumbleweed Runaway Program, Montana Healthy Partnership’s Medical Assistance Program, Boys and Girls Club, Family Services, Rebuilding Together, Living Independently for Today and Tomorrow (LIFTT), Homeword, YWCA, and Friendship House, to name a few.

Contact: Brenda Beckett, Community Development Manager, City of Billings. Phone: 406.657.8286, Fax: 406.294.7595. www.ci.billings.mt.us/comdev 


City of Great Falls HOME Program

The HOME Program of Great Falls is dedicated to funding projects that expand the supply of decent, safe, sanitary, and affordable housing for very low-income citizens of Great Falls. Eligible activities developed and managed by the Great Falls Housing Authority, nonprofit organizations or NeighborWorks® Great Falls, Inc. (a local CHDO) include housing assistance to very low- and low-income renters, housing assistance to very low- and low-income homebuyers, and housing assistance to homeless persons and households. Examples of eligible projects include new construction of affordable housing, housing rehabilitation, down payment, and closing cost assistance to low-income homebuyers, and transitional housing programs for homeless persons and households. Only projects located within the city limits are eligible for funding. Project proposals are accepted on an annual basis. Technical assistance for project development is available.

Contact: Jolene Wetterau, CDBG/HOME Administrator, Community Development, City of Great Falls. Phone: 406.455.8407, Fax: 406.454.9181.  www.greatfalls.net/planning


City of Missoula HOME Program

The City of Missoula administers a HUD-funded HOME Program designed to expand the supply of affordable housing opportunities for low- and moderate-income residents within the city limits. Eligible activities include new construction, property acquisition, residential rehabilitation, homebuyer assistance, and rental subsidy. The city solicits requests for funds on an annual basis. Currently, Missoula accepts requests from certified CHDOs, the Missoula Public Housing Authority, or the participating jurisdiction only. Technical assistance is available to applicants and to agencies interested in qualifying as CHDOs.

Contact: Nancy Harte, Senior Grants Administrator, City of Missoula. Phone: 406.258.4934, Fax: 406.258.4843. www.co.missoula.mt.us/grants/

Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program

The CDBG program is a flexible program that provides communities with resources to address a wide range of unique community development needs. The primary objective of the CDBG program is to develop viable communities by providing decent housing and a suitable living environment and by expanding economic opportunities for low- and moderate-income persons (LMI). Each activity funded must benefit at least 51% low- and moderate-income persons.


Statewide CDBG Program

Montana's statewide CDBG program is a competitive grant program designed to help Montana communities of less than 50,000 in population with their greatest community development needs. The state makes CDBG grants for community development activities to units of general-purpose local government (counties and municipalities, except the entitlement cities of Billings, Great Falls, and Missoula).

Montana administers two components of the state CDBG program through the Community Development and Business Resources Divisions of the MDOC.  Program funding for public facility and housing projects is administered by the Community Development Division.  Funding targeted for economic development projects is administered by the Business Resources Division.

Some of the activities that can be carried out with CDBG funds include acquiring real property; rehabilitating residential and nonresidential properties (including special facilities for persons with disabilities); constructing new, affordable housing (when sponsored by a nonprofit organization); providing public facilities and improvements such as water, sewer or solid waste facilities, senior citizen centers, rural hospitals and nursing homes; and assisting for-profit businesses to promote economic development activities that will result in the creation or retention of jobs for low- and moderate-income persons.

Under the housing and neighborhood renewal category, CDBG funds can be used to provide homebuyer assistance, including down payment assistance for low- and moderate-income homebuyers. CDBG funds may also be used to make low interest loans or grants to low- and moderate-income families to allow them to rehabilitate homes in substandard condition. CDBG funds can also be used to finance or subsidize the construction of new, permanent residential units for LMI households where the CDBG funds will be used by a local nonprofit organization. Housing projects can include site improvements to publicly owned land or land owned by a nonprofit organization to be used for new housing. Community revitalization activities, such as neighborhood clean-up and fix-up projects and the demolition of vacant, seriously dilapidated structures are eligible housing activities. The acquisition of sites for new housing and conversion of existing nonresidential structures for residential use are also eligible CDBG housing activities. Transitional (temporary) housing, emergency housing facilities and similar kinds of homeless shelters are eligible under the public facilities category.

Contact: Jennifer Olson, Bureau Chief, Grants Bureau, Community Development Division, Montana Department of Commerce. Phone: 406.841.2770, Fax: 406.841.2771 www.comdev.mt.gov


City of Billings HOME and CDBG Programs

The City of Billings HOME and CDBG program funds are used to achieve common goals and objectives of the city’s Consolidated Plan. The Billings CDBG and HOME program funds are used to promote fair housing and affordable housing citywide; to preserve and revitalize the city's existing affordable housing stock; and to improve and revitalize neighborhoods where existing affordable housing stock is located. HOME program funds are specifically used for first-time homebuyer activities and to help finance new affordable housing projects. CDBG program funds are also used to support new housing activities, but primarily are used for activities that update and improve the community's existing affordable housing stock.

The core programs for the City of Billings are assist low/moderate income households within the city limits and include: 1) First Time Homebuyers which assists households at or below 80% area median income with down payment and closing cost assistance to purchase a home; 2) Affordable Housing which assists in the development of new affordable housing for low and very low income households; 3) Housing Rehabilitation which is a no interest deferred loan for substantial rehab of affordable housing stock for low/moderate income homeowner occupied residents; 4) Minor Home Repair which is for emergency repairs of stick built homes as well as repairs for mobile homes 30 years old or newer; 5) Exterior Paint Program; and 6) Special Assessment Grants to assist low and very low income households with curb, gutter and sidewalk replacement generated through a special improvement district for work completed by the City of Billings.

In addition, the City of Billings works with community partners, both non-profit and for-profit organizations, to improve the living conditions of low and very low income individuals. Programs supported in the past include: Food Bank of Billings, South Side Senior Center, Yellowstone County Council on Aging, Big Sky Senior Services, Tumbleweed Runaway Program, Montana Healthy Partnership’s Medical Assistance Program, Boys and Girls Club, Family Services, Rebuilding Together, Living Independently for Today and Tomorrow (LIFTT), Homeword, YWCA, and Friendship House, to name a few.

Contact: Brenda Beckett, Community Development Manager, City of Billings. Phone: 406.657.8286, Fax: 406.294.7595. www.ci.billings.mt.us/comdev 


City of Great Falls CDBG Program

The primary objective of the City of Great Falls CDBG program is to use grant funds to benefit low- and moderate-income persons or to eliminate slums and blight. Providing decent housing, a suitable living environment, and expanding economic opportunities for low and moderate-income citizens enhances the community.

The City of Great Falls offers four CDBG-funded revolving loan programs to individuals within the city limits to promote affordable housing: 1) the deferred payment loan program provides no-interest loans to low-income homeowners for code-related repairs; 2) the water and sewer fund provides no/low interest loans to low-income homeowners or landlords having low-income tenants to construct or replace water and sewer service lines; 3) the rental improvement fund program provides no-interest loans to landlords to rehabilitate sub-standard rental units that will be made affordable to low-income tenants; and 4) the historic preservation fund provides no-interest loans to help landlords upgrading properties meet historic preservation requirements with the rental units being made affordable to low-income tenants.

The city also allocates CDBG housing funds to both for-profit and nonprofit organizations that develop accessible, affordable rental housing and to NeighborWorks-Great Falls, Inc., for programs that address the purchase, rehabilitation, and new construction of affordable housing. The City of Great Falls has a Fair Housing Specialist who works to promote Fair Housing.

The city uses CDBG funds to improve public facilities that are primarily used by low-income persons, to make infrastructure improvements in low-income neighborhoods, to promote handicap accessibility, and to provide support to public services agencies whose programs benefit very low- to moderate-income citizens. The city encourages the use of CDBG funds in economic development activities that will create job opportunities for members of lower-income households.

Only projects located within the Great Falls city limits are eligible for funding. Applications for city-administered housing programs are available on an ongoing basis; proposals for other projects are accepted on an annual basis.

Contact: Jolene Wetterau, CDBG/HOME Administrator, Community Development, City of Great Falls. Phone: 406.455.8407, Fax: 406.454.9181.  www.greatfalls.net/planning


City of Missoula CDBG Program

The City of Missoula receives an annual allocation of approximately $642,000 from HUD, which is available to support activities that benefit low- and moderate-income households in the areas of housing, public facilities, economic development and public services. The city conducts a competitive funding process for projects each year between September and November. Technical assistance is available to agencies and individuals interested in participating in the program. 

Contact: Nancy Harte, Senior Grants Administrator, City of Missoula. Phone: 406.258.4934, Fax: 406.258.4843. www.co.missoula.mt.us/grants/

Indian Community Development Block Grant (ICDBG) Program

The Indian Community Development Block Grant Program provides eligible grantees with direct grants for use in developing viable Indian and Alaska Native Communities, including decent housing, housing rehabilitation, land acquisition to support new housing, homeownership assistance, a suitable living environment, public facilities, and economic and microenterprise development, primarily for low and moderate-income persons (see 24 CFR 1003, subpart C for more details).

Contact: Michael E. Boyd, Director, Grants Management Division, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Northern Plains Office of Native American Programs, Denver: 303.672.5170.

Tenant Based Section 8 Program Rental Vouchers and Moderate Rehabilitation

Financed by HUD and administered by the MDOC Housing Division, Tenant Based Section 8 (TBS8) Housing Assistance Programs allow very low-income families to pay a set amount toward rent and utilities (currently 30%), based on their gross adjusted income. Very low-income families have incomes of 50% or less of the HUD median family income for the county in which the family resides. HUD establishes income limits annually. The programs provide subsidy payments to property owners on behalf of program participants.

The TBS8 program has 11 field offices throughout the state, providing field services: issuing assistance documents, performing inspections, and examining annual income. The wait list to obtain a voucher is approximately 30 months (2½ years) with approximately 7,700 applicants. The Housing Choice Vouchers is the main program in TBS8, with a HUD baseline of 3,761 units.

The Moderate Rehabilitation (Mod Rehab) program is in essence, a project-based program. Owners of substandard property in Montana rehabilitate the property to meet HUD housing quality standards (HQS) and receive subsidized rent for 15 years at a rate high enough to cover the debt service on rehabilitation loans. TBS8 provides a list of prospective tenants and inspects the rental units annually to ensure continued compliance with HQS.

Contact: John Schreck, Tenant Based Section 8 Program Manager, Housing Division, Montana Department of Commerce: 406.841.2828; Fax: 406.841.2810.

Project Based Section 8 Program

The MDOC Housing Assistance Bureau administers the Montana Project Based Section 8 (PBS8) program. Active since November 2000, PBS8 performs as a HUD contractor for management and oversight activities for 95 contracts involving 4,236 affordable rental units. PBS8 conducts on-site management reviews annually for the entire contract portfolio. In addition, PBS8 approves and processes payment vouchers to property owners and agents.

Contact: Diana Collver-Vanek, Project Based Section 8 Program Manager, Housing Division, Montana Department of Commerce: 406.841.2817, Fax 406.841.2810.

Emergency Shelter Grants (ESG) Program

The Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services (MDPHHS) Human and Community Services Division administers the ESG Program to help improve the quality of existing emergency shelters for the homeless, make available additional shelters, meet the costs of operating shelters, and provide essential social services to help prevent homelessness. The grant is 100% funded by HUD. Ninety-five percent (95%) of funds received are allocated to the 10 regional Human Resource Development Councils (HRDCs) in the state. The grants fund the renovation, rehabilitation or operating costs of homeless shelters, and provide follow-up and long-term services to help homeless persons escape poverty. Shelters to be assisted and services to be delivered are determined locally by the HRDCs.

Contact: Jim Nolan, Intergovernmental Human Services Bureau, Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services: 406.447.4260. 

Housing Opportunities for Persons With AIDS (HOPWA) Program

The MDPHHS Human and Community Services Division also administers the HOPWA Program. In 2002, MDPHHS received its first three-year competitive HOPWA grant covering the states of Montana, North Dakota, and South Dakota. Since then, the MDPHHS was awarded other HOPWA renewal grants a competitive grant to continue operating the Tri-State Housing Environments for Living Positively (TS HELP) program. This program is a continuum of housing and related supportive service opportunities for people living with HIV/AIDS and their families in the three states, which do not qualify for direct HOPWA formula grant funding. TS HELP is a partnership between MDPHHS and four private agencies: the Sioux Falls Housing and Redevelopment Commission in South Dakota, Region VII Community Action Program in North Dakota, and Missoula AIDS Council and Yellowstone AIDS Project in Montana.

Contact: Jim Nolan, Intergovernmental Human Services Bureau, Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services: 406.447.4260.

Housing Prevention/Rapid Re-housing Program (HPRP)

Administered by the MDPHHS Human and Community Services Division HPRP provides homeless prevention assistance to households who would otherwise become homeless, and assistance to rapidly re-house persons who are homeless.

Funded by a one-time appropriation of $3.3 million from the Federal Stimulus Act (ARRA), the program will operate until funds are depleted, but not longer than two years. Funds are distributed by the state’s HRDC’s on behalf of eligible clients (no more than 50% AMI). No payments are made to individuals.

Contact: Jim Nolan, Intergovernmental Human Services Bureau, Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services: 406.447.4260.

HUD-Funded Homeless Assistance Programs

HUD's Homeless Assistance programs are broken down into two main categories, formula (non-competitive), and competitive. Competitive programs are under the umbrella of Continuum of Care. For more detailed information on homeless assistance programs, go to HUD’s website on the Homelessness Resource Exchange: http://www.hudhre.info

The McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act programs administered by HUD that award funds competitively require the development of a "Continuum of Care" system in the community where assistance is being sought. A continuum of care system is designed to address the critical problem of homelessness through a coordinated community-based process of identifying needs and building a system to address those needs. The approach is predicated on the understanding that homelessness is not caused merely by a lack of shelter, but involves a variety of underlying, unmet needs: physical, economic, and social. Funds are granted based on the competition following the Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA): http://www.hud.gov/grants/.


Shelter Plus Care (SPC) Program

Shelter Plus Care grants help provide housing and supportive services on a long-term basis for homeless people with disabilities, especially serious mental illness, chronic drug or alcohol problems, and AIDS. Program grants are used for the provision of rental assistance payments through Section 8 Moderate Rehabilitation for Single Room Occupancy (SRO), sponsor‑based rental assistance (SRA), tenant‑based rental assistance (TRA), or project‑based rental assistance (PRA).

SPC funds are awarded in a nationwide competition, with priority given to homeless needs. States, units of local government, and public housing authorities can apply for SPC grants. Support services must match rental assistance and must be supplied by federal, state, or local governments or private sources.

Non‑PHA applicants applying for the SRO component must subcontract with a PHA to administer the rental housing assistance. Applicants for the SRA must subcontract with a nonprofit organization, a sponsor, to provide rental assistance to sponsor‑owned or leased units. PRA applicants must subcontract with a building owner to provide rental assistance for units in a particular property.

As funds become available, a NOFA is published in the Federal Register. Eligible applicants interested in applying for Shelter Plus Care funding in Montana will need to apply through the Montana Continuum of Care Coalition for the Homeless.

Primary Contact: Bob Buzzas, Montana Continuum of Care Coalition for the Homeless: 406.586.1572.

Contact: Ed Atencio, U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development‑Denver: 303.672.5080.[JJ1] 


Supportive Housing Program (SHP)

The Supportive Housing Program is designed to develop supportive housing and services that will allow homeless persons to live as independently as possible. Eligible applicants are states, units of local government, other governmental entities such as PHAs, and private nonprofits.

The SHP is authorized by Title IV, Subtitle C, of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act of 1987, as amended. It is designed to promote, as part of a local Continuum of Care strategy, the development of supportive housing and supportive services to assist homeless persons in the transition from homelessness and to enable them to live as independently as possible.

Assistance in the Supportive Housing Program is provided to help homeless persons meet three overall goals:

  • achieve residential stability,
  • increase their skill levels and/or incomes, and
  • obtain greater self-determination (i.e., more influence over decisions that affect their lives).

Specific performance measures for each of these three goals must be established based on the needs and characteristics of the homeless population to be served. Grant recipients are required to monitor their clients' progress in meeting their performance measures on an ongoing basis. In addition to recordkeeping and evaluation that grantees may conduct for their own purposes, HUD requires recordkeeping and annual progress reports. The annual progress report includes questions that ask grantees to report on their progress in meeting performance measures. Grantees are expected to make changes in their program or adjust performance measures in response to ongoing evaluation of their progress.

As funds become available, a NOFA will be published in the Federal Register. Nonprofits interested in applying for SHP funding in Montana will need to apply through the Montana Continuum of Care Coalition for the Homeless.

Primary Contact: Bob Buzzas, Montana Continuum of Care Coalition for the Homeless: 406.586.1572

Contact: Ed Atencio, U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development‑Denver: 303.672.5080.[JJ2] 


Single Room Occupancy (SRO) Program for Homeless Individuals

The SRO Program provides rental assistance for homeless persons in connection with the moderate rehabilitation of SRO dwellings. SRO housing contains units for occupancy by one person. These units may contain food preparation or sanitary facilities, or both.

Under the program, HUD enters into Annual Contributions Contracts with public housing agencies in connection with the moderate rehabilitation of residential properties that, when rehabilitation is completed, will contain multiple single room dwelling units. These PHAs make Section 8 rental assistance payments to participating owners (i.e., landlords) on behalf of homeless individuals who rent the rehabilitated dwellings. The rental assistance payments cover the difference between a portion of the tenant's income (normally 30%) and the unit's rent, which must be within the fair market rent (FMR) established by HUD.

Rental assistance for SRO units is provided for a period of 10 years. Owners are compensated for the cost of some of the rehabilitation (as well as the other costs of owning and maintaining the property) through the rental assistance payments. To be eligible for assistance, a unit must receive a minimum of $3,000 of rehabilitation, including its prorated share of work to be accomplished on common areas or systems, to meet HQS.

Assistance provided under the SRO program is designed to bring more standard SRO units into the local housing supply and to use those units to assist homeless persons. The SRO units might be in a rundown hotel, an old school, or a large abandoned home.

As funds become available, a NOFA will be published in the Federal Register. Eligible applicants interested in applying for SRO funding in Montana will need to apply through the Montana Continuum of Care Coalition for the Homeless.

Primary Contact: Bob Buzzas, Montana Continuum of Care Coalition for the Homeless: 406.586.1572.

Contact: Ed Atencio, U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development‑Denver: 303.672.5080.

Supportive Housing for the Elderly (Section 202)

Supportive Housing for the Elderly provides funding to expand the supply of housing with supportive services for very low-income persons 62 years of age or older. Initial legislation authorizing this program was enacted in the Housing Act of 1959 (Section 202) and was amended in 1990 by Section 801 of the National Affordable Housing Act. Section 202 funding falls into two categories: capital advances and project rental assistance. Capital advances are to finance elderly housing that also offers supportive services. The advances are non-interest-bearing, and are based on development cost limits published in the Federal Register. Project rental assistance covers the difference between the HUD-approved operating cost per unit and 30% of resident’s adjusted income. Funds can be used for acquisition, rehabilitation, new construction, rental assistance, and support services for households containing at least one person over 62 years of age. Private, nonprofit organizations and consumer cooperatives are eligible to apply.

A NOFA is usually issued in early spring for Supportive Housing for the Elderly and funding is available for eligible Montana entities. Applications scoring the highest receive funding. To receive application materials, download the information from www.grants.gov/. Applicants are required to submit an electronic application unless they receive a waiver of the requirement from HUD Headquarters. Regulations and guidelines may be found in HUD Handbook 4571.3 Rev-1 Supportive Housing for the Elderly and 24 CFR 891.

Contact: Elaine Chavez, U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development, Denver Multifamily Hub: 303.672.5427.

Supportive Housing for Persons with Disabilities (Section 811)

Section 811 grant monies are awarded to nonprofit organizations providing assistance to expand housing with supportive services for persons with disabilities. This often includes group homes and independent living facilities. Section 811 is targeted toward persons with a physical or developmental disability or chronic mental illness that is expected to be of long and indefinite duration, substantially impedes the person's ability to live independently, and is of such a nature that such ability could be improved by more suitable housing conditions.

The program was authorized by the National Affordable Housing Act, Section 811. The competitive grants are available in two forms: capital advances based on the development cost limits published in the Federal Register, and project rental assistance to cover the difference between HUD-approved operating costs and 30% of the resident's adjusted income. Occupancy is open to very low-income persons who are at least 18 years old.

A NOFA is usually published in early spring in the Federal Register for Supportive Housing for Persons with Disabilities. Funding is available for eligible entities in Montana. Those applications scoring highest receive funding. For application materials, download the information from www.grants.gov/. Applicants are required to submit an electronic application unless they receive a waiver of the requirement from HUD Headquarters. Regulations and guidelines may be found in HUD Handbook 4571.2 Supportive Housing for Persons with Disabilities, and 24 CFR 891.

Contact: Elaine Chavez, U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development, Denver Multifamily Hub: 303.672.5427. 

HUD-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (VASH) Voucher Program

The HUD-VASH Program is a nationwide housing program is jointly supported by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. This voucher program was expanded by Congress in December 2007. In Montana, applications are submitted to the Veteran’s Administration at Fort Harrison. The MDOC Section 8 Program in Helena was the first recipient of HUD-VASH funding because the jurisdiction is statewide and allows for broad housing choice. In 2009, the VA received additional funding in cooperation with the Housing Authority of Billings to receive funding for veterans in the city limits of Billings.

The primary goal of HUD-VASH is to assist chronically homeless veterans and their families successfully transition from homelessness, into decent, safe, and affordable housing in the community while providing services that support the family’s ongoing needs.

Veterans who apply for the HUD-VASH program are assigned a VA case manager who completes an eligibility screening for the VASH program. The VA makes referrals to the Public Housing Authority for eligible applicants to obtain a Section 8 voucher. The VA assists the Veteran in their housing search and the Public Housing Authority provides the family with rental assistance payments to a private landlord in the community. Case management continues for as long as the veteran receives housing assistance.

Homeless veterans who are interested in the HUD-VASH program should contact the VA Homeless Veterans Program Office at Fort Harrison Regional Center outside Helena, Montana listed below. 

Contact: Homeless Veteran’s Program, 3687 Veterans Drive, Fort Harrison, MT  59636 at 800.827.1000 for information on the VASH Program. Information on the VASH program also appears on the VA website at www.va.gov


HOUSING DIVISION | MONTANA DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
301 S. PARK AVE, STE 240 | PO BOX 200528 | HELENA, MT 59620-0528 | P: (406) 841-2840 | F: (406) 841-2841 | TDD: (406) 841-2702 | TOLL FREE: (800) 761-6264


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