Housing Resource Directory

 

 

OTHER FEDERAL HOUSING PROGRAMS

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RURAL DEVELOPMENT (USDA) HOUSING PROGRAMS

U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development (RD) loans and grants are available to assist rural Montana with Single Family Housing and Multifamily Housing needs. RD partners with local lenders, community groups and local, state and federal funding sources.

USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer and lender. To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400  Independence Ave., S.W., Washington, DC  20250-9410 or call 800.795.3272 (voice) or 202.720.6382 (TDD).

 


Single Family Housing Programs

The single family housing programs provide homeownership opportunities to very low-, low- and moderate-income rural residents through several loan, grant, and guarantee programs. The program also provides loans and grants to individuals to finance the vital improvements necessary to make their homes decent, safe, and sanitary.


Rural Housing Guaranteed Loans (Section 502)

The purpose of this program is to assist low- and moderate-income households through the 90% guarantee of loans made by conventional lenders for acquisition of single-family homes. Because a down payment is not required, this program helps borrowers by reducing the closing costs. In addition, there is no mortgage insurance premium cost, which further reduces the up-front costs and monthly payments.

Applicant Requirements: To qualify for a loan guarantee, each applicant must meet all of the following criteria:

  • Be unable to obtain a loan through a conventional mortgage source
  • Have sufficient income to meet all obligations
  • Principal, interest, taxes, and insurance (PITI) cannot exceed 29% of monthly gross income
  • Total indebtedness (monthly obligations) cannot exceed 41% of monthly gross income
  • Have an acceptable credit history
  • Be a U.S. citizen or be legally admitted to the U.S. for permanent residency
  • Be the owner occupant of the dwelling
  • Adjusted annual income must meet the income requirements for the area (less than 115% of area median income). Contact your local office for the applicable area limits.

Home Requirements: In addition to applicant requirements, there are also certain requirements for the home. It must provide modest, decent, safe, and sanitary housing for the family and cannot have an in-ground swimming pool or other structures designed for income-producing purposes. The land value of the property cannot exceed 30% of the appraised market value of the home. The property must meet FHA requirements.


502 Leveraged Loans

Under this program, a minimum of 20% of the total mortgage is covered by a loan from the conventional lender, while the remainder is financed through a USDA RD loan at a lower interest rate based on the borrower’s income. This provides the borrower with a “blended” interest rate lower than market rates. Applicant’s income is limited to less than 80% of area median income.


502 Direct Loans

In limited circumstances, borrowers can receive a 100% direct loan from USDA for the entire purchase price of the home at significantly lower interest rates. Because available funds for the program are limited, assistance under this program is reserved for those with the greatest need looking for homes in targeted areas. Applicant’s income is limited to less than 80% of area median income.

Contact: Kim Maines, State Housing Specialist, USDA Rural Development;  Phone: 406.585.2515; Fax: 855.576.2674.


504 Repair Loans and Grants

USDA Rural Development also helps existing homeowners with home improvement loans to improve or modernize their existing home. Eligible very low-income residents (less than 50% of area median income) can apply for loans of up to $20,000 at one percent interest with a repayment period of up to 20 years.

Very low-income elderly residents aged 62 or older may qualify for grants or a combination of grants and loans to remove health or safety hazards. Lifetime grant assistance is limited to $7,500.

Eligible improvements include:

  • Installing and repairing sanitary water and waste disposal systems, including related plumbing and fixtures
  • Paying reasonable connection fees for utilities
  • Installing various energy conservation measures including insulation and storm windows
  • Repairing or replacing heating systems and electrical wiring
  • Making structural improvements including repairing or providing structural supports, repairing or replacing the roof, and replacing severely deteriorated siding
  • Improving homes to make them accessible to handicapped residents

Contact: Kim Maines, State Housing Specialist, USDA Rural Development;  Phone: 406.585.2515; Fax: 855.576.2674.


Technical Assistance Grants/Mutual Self-Help Housing Program

Another option available for some families in Montana is the Mutual Self-Help Housing Program. Through this program, nonprofit organizations receive technical assistance grants to help very low- and low-income families build their own homes. Applicants must show a need for self-help housing, the professional expertise to supervise a project, and a lack of funding to be eligible for this assistance.

Approved applicants in groups of 8 to 12 families provide sweat equity, working together under the guidance of professionals to build each other's homes. When all the homes are completed, each family has gained shelter, confidence, beneficial skills, and an unparalleled sense of community relationship.

Contact: Kim Maines, State Housing Specialist, USDA Rural Development;  Phone: 406.585.2515; Fax: 855.576.2674.

 


RD Multifamily Housing Programs

 

Section 515 Rural Rental Housing Loans

Increased home prices have resulted in a higher percentage of renters throughout the nation. More facilities are needed to meet this demand. The multifamily housing Section 515 program provides financing to build or purchase and repair, apartment style housing for very low- and low-income residents in rural communities with a population of up to 20,000 people. Tenants pay 30% of their monthly gross income and the program subsidizes the remaining rent through rental assistance. Interest rates are subsidized at one percent. The loan term is 30 years with a 50-year amortization.

The housing must be modest in size, design, and cost, but adequate to meet the tenants’ needs.

Eligible applicants include individuals, trusts, associations, general partnerships, limited partnerships, limited liability companies, state or local public agencies, and limited-profit and nonprofit corporations. Nonprofit corporations may be organized on a regional or multi-county basis. Loans to nonprofits may be up to 100% of the appraised value or development cost, whichever is less.

Contact: Sandi Messinger, State Housing Specialist, USDA Rural Development;  Phone: 406.585.2515; Fax: 855.576.2674.


Section 538 Guaranteed Rural Rental Housing Program

The Section 538 Guaranteed Rural Rental Housing Program is available thanks to a partnership between the Federal government and major financial lending institutions. The program is designed to help qualified local lenders serve the rental housing needs of low- and moderate-income households in their community.

Under the RHS Guaranteed Rural Rental Housing Program, qualified lenders are authorized to originate, underwrite, and close loans for multifamily housing complexes requiring new construction. In turn, USDA will guarantee the lender’s loan up to 90% of the total development cost and will commit to paying up to 90% of the outstanding principal and interest in the event of a default on the loan. The program has had less than a one percent default rate over its history.

The loan guarantees can be used with other subsidy funding programs such as the Low Income Housing Tax Credit program, Montana Department of Commerce’s HOME Program, and state rental assistance programs.

To be eligible for the program, lenders should be approved as multifamily lenders through FHA, Fannie Mae, or Freddie Mac. Other lenders with multifamily lending experience may also be approved, such as Federal Home Loan Bank system members and state or local Housing Finance Authorities (HFAs).

The lender must assume the risk on the unguaranteed portion of the loan, underwrite, and originate loans for the guarantee. The lender performs all loan servicing functions, including asset management and liquidation, and monitors rent and income levels of the project.

Loan guarantees can be used for:

  • New construction, and moderate or substantial rehabilitation
  • Acquisition of buildings that meet “special housing needs”
  • Combination of construction and permanent loans
  • Construction of a wide variety of housing types

Eligible borrowers include:

  • Individuals
  • Nonprofit or limited-profit corporations
  • Partnerships
  • Limited liability companies
  • Trusts
  • State and local agencies
  • Indian tribes
  • Any other entity deemed eligible

Contact: Sandi Messinger, State Housing Specialist, USDA Rural Development;  Phone: 406.585.2515; Fax: 855.576.2674.


Farm Labor Housing

Farm Labor Housing provides loans and grants to farm owners, family farm organizations, state and local public agencies, and private broad-based organizations or nonprofit organizations of farm workers. The basic objective is to provide decent, safe, and affordable housing for domestic and migrant farm labor located in areas where the need exists. The housing units can be located on or off the farm property.

Contact: Sandi Messinger, State Housing Specialist, USDA Rural Development;  Phone: 406.585.2515; Fax: 855.576.2674.

 


Rural Development Housing Preservation Grants

Housing Preservation Grants are provided to nonprofit and governmental organizations to remove health and safety hazards to owner-occupied residences or rental housing for low-income individuals. These grants are combined with other funding sources to accomplish the repairs.

Contact: Sandi Messinger, State Housing Specialist, USDA Rural Development;  Phone: 406.585.2515; Fax: 855.576.2674.

Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) Program

The low income housing tax credit, established by Congress in the Tax Reform Act of 1986, is intended to provide for retaining, rehabilitating, and/or constructing low-income rental housing. Through the program, developers and owners of qualified housing receive an annual federal tax credit for 10 years, based on the number of housing units provided to low-income individuals and families. The Montana Board of Housing (MBOH) administers the LIHTC in Montana and receives authority to allocate the credit through the Internal Revenue Code of approximately $2.1 million per year. Staff monitors projects to ensure low-income tenant and rent restrictions are met. Any non-compliance issues are reported to the IRS.

Contact: Mary Bair, Multifamily Program Manager, Montana Board of Housing, 301 S. Park Ave, Ste. 240, Helena, MT 59601; Phone: 406.841.2845. 

http://housing.mt.gov/MFDevelopment

Veterans Administration (VA) Direct Loans for Native Americans Living on Trust Lands Loan Program

The VA Native American Direct Loan (NADL) Program is available to assist eligible Native American veterans purchase, build, or improve a home on Tribal Trust Lands. Loan amounts are determined by an appraisal of the property, but are limited to a maximum loan limit governed by the conforming limit. To qualify, the applicant’s tribal organization or group must have signed an agreement to participate in the NADL Program. The applicant must be determined to be a satisfactory credit risk and have sufficient income to repay the loan before the loan can be approved.

Native American Veterans desiring more information or wanting to determine his or her eligibility for the NADL Program should:

Contact: VA Regional Loan Center, Box 25126, Denver, CO 80225, or toll-free: 888.349.7541, option 2.

U.S. Department of Energy and Other Energy Programs

Energy program funds are available from the U.S. Department of Energy and other agencies. Allocations can be used for rehabilitation and new construction.


Weatherization

Energy costs are one of the greatest demands on a low-income family's resources. During Montana's winter, these costs can exceed rental or mortgage costs. The weatherization program, administered by the MDPHHS, is primarily funded by the U.S. Departments of Energy and Health and Human Services. The program is designed to help low-income persons reduce their home heating costs and to conserve natural resources. The funds are directed toward local HRDCs and tribal organizations. These groups decide where the grant money will be spent to install energy saving measures in the homes of low-income persons. Homes are prioritized based on energy consumption. Specific measures are decided upon after each home has had an energy audit to determine what activities would be most cost-effective. Measures include insulation, caulking, and furnace repair or replacement. Labor and materials are purchased locally. By reducing overall costs, weatherization helps a family stay in their home, increasing family self-sufficiency.

Funds are currently available and are being allocated in the weatherization program. Submitted applications scoring highest receive funding. Apply by calling the contact listed below or 800.332.2272.

Contact: Jim Nolan, Intergovernmental Human Services Bureau, Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services: 406.447.4260.


Low Income Energy Assistance Program (LIEAP)

The Human and Community Services Division Low Income Energy Assistance Program (LIEAP) is primarily funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The goal of this program is to assist low-income families in meeting home heating costs. Funding for households is determined using matrix tables that factor the household's income, fuel type, size and type of home, and local heating degree-days. Most payments are made directly to the household's utility company. Emergency payments are allowed for unforeseen energy-related events. Up to 15% of the block grant may be used for weatherization activities to decrease long-term heating cost problems.

Apply by calling the contact listed below or toll free at 800.332.2272.

Contact: Jim Nolan, Intergovernmental Human Services Bureau, Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services: 406.447.4260


HUD Energy Star Initiative

HUD joined with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and DOE to promote Energy Star (www.energystar.gov) in all HUD programs through a Memorandum of Understanding (www.hud.gov/news/release.cfm?content=pr02-105.cfm) signed by Secretary Martinez in 2002. HUD will work with EPA and DOE to expand the use of Energy Star products in assisted and public housing and in projects financed through other HUD programs such as CDBG and HOME. Energy Star is a voluntary labeling program designed to identify and promote energy efficient products and appliances. Energy Star-labeled products save energy and money and protect the environment. Improved energy efficiency in housing can generate significant savings for property owners and building residents.

Contact: Erik Amundson, U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development, Helena Field Office; Phone: 406.447.1488; Fax: 406.449.5052;

website: http://www.hud.gov/energy/

Guaranteed Loan Programs

A number of guaranteed loan programs at or below market rates are available for qualified homebuyers. Financial institutions in partnership with the Montana Board of Housing make guaranteed loans available to Native Americans and those living in rural settings. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs offers guaranteed loans to eligible service members, veterans, and unmarried surviving spouses.


HUD Section 184 Indian Housing Program

HUD’s Section 184 Loan Guarantee Program is a unique approach to providing Native Americans with access to capital on and off the reservation, by utilizing a public-private sector partnership. The funding for the mortgage is private sector funds and HUD provides the mortgage guarantee. This partnership enables Native American families and tribally designated housing entities (TDHEs) to gain access to sources of private financing. A tribal member who will occupy the property as his/her principal home and has met certain credit and underwriting standards is an eligible borrower. Tribally designated housing entities that may borrow funds for the development of single-family housing and up to four units of multifamily housing. These units are subsequently sold to eligible borrowers. Loans are processed by lenders and reviewed by HUD’s Office of Loan Guarantee in Denver, Colorado. Lenders can be direct endorsement certified. To apply, visit any approved lender (financial institution) and apply for a mortgage loan.

Contact: Edward Vaughan, Native American Program Specialist, U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development, Northern Plains Office of Native American Programs, Denver, Colorado; Phone: 303-672-5179.

The Montana Board of Housing has over $1,000,000 in recycled mortgage funds to provide the permanent financing for qualifying lower income individuals for single-family homes that are guaranteed by HUD through Section 184 for Native Americans. MBOH worked with local banks, tribal representatives, bond counsel, state and regional HUD officials to get special consideration and guarantees from the Secretary of HUD in Washington D.C. to enable MBOH to participate in this program.

Contact: Charles Brown, Homeownership Program, Montana Board of Housing: 406.841.2850.


HUD Title VI Loan Guarantee Program

HUD’s Title VI Loan Guarantee Program enables TDHEs to leverage current and future Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Act (NAHASDA) dollars to address immediate housing needs on the reservation. The borrower leverages these funds to finance affordable housing activities today by pledging future grant funds as security for repayment of the guarantee obligation. A private lender or investor provides the financing and HUD provides the guarantee to the lender or investor.

Contact: Edward Vaughan, Native American Program Specialist, U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development, Northern Plains Office of Native American Programs, Denver, Colorado; Phone: 303-672-5179.


Indian Housing Block Grant (IHBG) Program

The Indian Housing Block Grant Program provides grantees with formula based funding allocated to Indian tribes in compliance with the requirements under the Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Act (NAHASDA).  Affordable housing activities under NAHASDA include Indian housing assistance, development, housing services, housing management services, crime prevention and safety activities, and model activities (see 24 CFR 1000, subpart B for more details).

Contact: Lori Roget, Director, Grants Management Division, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Northern Plains Office of Native American Programs, Denver, Colorado, 303.672.5175.


Tribal Colleges and Universities Program (TCUP)

The purpose of the Tribal Colleges and Universities Program (TCUP) is to build, expand, renovate, and equip tribal colleges and universities, and to expand the role of colleges and universities in the community through the provision of needed services such as health programs, job training, and economic development activities.

Contact: Lori Roget, Director, Grants Management Division, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Northern Plains Office of Native American Programs, Denver, Colorado, 303.672.5175.


HUD Housing Counseling Grant Program

The objective of this program is to counsel homeowners, homebuyers, and prospective renters and tenants in improving their housing conditions and in meeting the responsibilities of tenancy and homeownership. The uses are to provide a variety of housing counseling services including single family home buying, renting, defaults, foreclosure prevention, credit issues and reverse mortgages. Eligible applicants are qualified public or private nonprofit organizations that can provide special competence and knowledge counseling for low- and moderate-income families. The program has no matching fund requirements. However, applicants need to demonstrate funding from other resources.

Contact: Patricia Heiser at the Helena Field Office; Phone: 406.449.5050, or toll free at 1.800.569.4287 for the nearest Housing Counseling Agency.


Rural Housing and Economic Development (RHED) Program

The objective of this program is to expand the supply of affordable housing and access to economic opportunities in rural areas. Grants can be used for capacity building, and support for innovative housing and economic development activities. Eligible applicants are rural nonprofit organizations and community development corporations, federally recognized tribes, state housing finance agencies, and state community and economic development agencies.

Contact: Erik Amundson, U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development, Helena Field Office; Phone: 406.447.1488; Fax: 406.449.5052; website: http://www.hud.gov/energy/.


U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Guaranteed Home Loans for Veterans

The VA guarantees loans made by mortgage lenders to eligible military veterans, active duty military service members, certain members of the National Guard and Selective Reserves, and certain un-remarried surviving spouses of deceased veterans. The purpose of a VA Guaranteed loan can be to purchase, build, or improve personal residences, or to refinance an outstanding mortgage on a home. Properties securing VA loans must meet acceptable Minimum Property Standards. The VA does not require a down payment and the maximum loan amount is determined by the lesser of the appraised value or the cost of the home. "Cash out refinance loans" are limited to 90% of the appraised value of the home. Applicants must be determined to be a satisfactory credit risk and have sufficient income to repay the loan and certify that they intend to occupy the property as their permanent place of residence.

To apply for a Certificate of Eligibility for VA Loan Guaranty Benefits, a veteran should complete a Request for Determination of Eligibility, VA Form 26-1880, and submit it with proof of military service to the VA Eligibility Center, PO Box 20729, Winston-Salem, NC 27120. Their overnight mail address is: 251 North Main Street, Winston-Salem, NC 27155. The e-mail address for Winston-Salem is: ncleligib@vba.va.gov. (Note: If the veteran is working with a mortgage lender, the lender may request the Certificate of Eligibility electronically.) Further information about VA loans is also available. Visit the lender training website at: www.vba.va.gov/ro/denver/loan/lendertraining.htm.

Contact: Loan Production, VA Regional Loan Center, Box 25126, Denver, CO 80225-0126; or toll-free: 888.349.7541, option 2.

HUD/FHA Mortgage Insurance and Conversion Programs

The Federal Housing Administration (FHA), which is part of HUD, helps homebuyers become homeowners through its mortgage insurance programs. An FHA insured loan is available to anyone with a satisfactory credit record, an income sufficient to afford the mortgage payments, and adequate savings to cover a low down payment and closing costs. Homebuyers wishing to obtain an FHA insured mortgage should contact any FHA approved lending institution such as a bank, mortgage company, savings and loan, or credit union.


Section 203B Insured Loans

This program is limited to owner occupant buyers for the purchase of a new or existing one-to-four unit dwelling. The down payment requirement is 3% of the purchase price or appraised value, whichever is lower.

The maximum mortgage FHA can insure depends on local housing prices. For example, the maximum mortgage can range from a low of $200,160 to $384,936, depending on the number of units in the dwelling and the county in which it is located. Contact a lender for information on maximum mortgage limits in your area and to apply for an FHA insured mortgage. The loan limits on 203B loans change each year. Contact the Helena office for the updated loan limit information.

Contact: Patricia Heiser, HUD/FHA – Helena Field Office; Phone: 406.449.5050; Fax: 406.449.5052.


Section 203K Substantial Rehabilitation Insured Loans

This program allows an owner occupant or investor to finance the purchase of a property in need of major repairs, or to refinance an existing loan and needed repairs. Using a 203K insured mortgage, the borrower can get one mortgage loan at a long-term fixed (or adjustable) rate to finance the purchase price of the property as well as the cost of repairs. The benefit to the lender is that the loan is FHA insurable at closing, before any repairs are started. The benefit to the borrower is that only one loan is necessary to purchase and repair the home. Without 203K, a purchaser would likely have to obtain one loan to purchase the property, another loan to do the repairs and another permanent mortgage when the work was completed to pay off the interim loans with the permanent mortgage.

The program is flexible. It can be used to improve an existing one-to-four unit dwelling in any of the following ways:

  • Buy a home and remodel
  • Refinance your present home and remodel
  • Buy a house and move it onto a new foundation on another property
  • Place a manufactured home (built after 6/15/76) on a permanent foundation
  • Convert a single family home to a 2- to 4-unit property
  • Remodel a multi-unit property to a single family home
  • Rebuild a damaged or demolished home if the existing foundation is acceptable

For example, the 203K can be used to remodel a kitchen, add a bathroom, finish a basement, build a new garage, install new siding, drill a well, replace a septic system, update the plumbing, heating or electrical systems, repair or replace a roof, install new flooring, install energy efficiency items, or other types of remodeling. Contact a lender for information on maximum mortgage limits in your area and to apply for an FHA 203K insured mortgage.

Contact: Patricia Heiser, HUD/FHA – Helena Field Office; Phone: 406.449.5050; Fax: 406.449.5052.


“Streamline (K)” Limited Repair Program

The “Streamline (K)” program is intended to assist homeowners with basic minor repairs costing up to $35,000. The Streamline (K) program is a modification of the 203(K) program to facilitate purchase transactions in which the property needs minor rehabilitation work, as identified in a pre-purchase home inspection or FHA appraisal. Unlike the standard 203(K) program, any approved mortgage will allow for acquisition and from $0 to $35,000 in the loan proceeds to be applied toward repair/rehabilitation of the property.

Contact: Patricia Heiser, HUD/FHA - Helena Field Office; Phone: 406.449.5050; Fax: 406.449.5052.


Home Equity Conversion Mortgages (HECM)

Homeowners, age 62 and older, who have paid off their mortgages or have only small mortgage balances remaining, are eligible to participate in HUD's reverse mortgage program. The program allows homeowners to borrow against the equity in their homes. Homeowners can receive payments in a lump sum, on a monthly basis (for a fixed term or for as long as they live in the home), or on an occasional basis as a line of credit. Homeowners whose circumstances change can restructure their payment options.

Unlike ordinary home equity loans, a HUD reverse mortgage does not require repayment as long as the borrower lives in the home. Lenders recover their principal, plus interest, when the home is sold. The remaining value of the home goes to the homeowner or to his or her survivors. If the sales proceeds are insufficient to pay the amount owed, HUD will pay the lender the amount of the shortfall. The FHA collects an insurance premium from all borrowers to provide this coverage.

The size of reverse mortgage loans is determined by the borrower's age, the interest rate, and the home's value. The older a borrower, the larger the percentage of the home's value that can be borrowed. For example, based on a loan at 9% interest, a 65-year-old could borrow up to 26% of the home's value, a 75-year-old could borrow up to 39% of the home's value, and an 85-year-old could borrow up to 56% of the home's value.

There are no asset or income limitations on borrowers receiving HUD's reverse mortgages. There are also no limits on the value of homes qualifying for a HUD reverse mortgage. However, the amount that may be borrowed is capped by the maximum FHA mortgage limit for the area. As a result, owners of higher-priced homes cannot borrow any more than owners of homes valued at the FHA limit.

HUD's reverse mortgage program collects funds from insurance premiums charged to borrowers. Senior citizens are charged 2% of the home's value as an up-front payment plus one-half percent on the loan balance each year. These amounts are usually paid by the lender and charged to the borrower's principal balance. Contact a lender for information on maximum mortgage limits in your area and to apply for a HUD/FHA Home Equity Conversion mortgage.

Contact: Patricia Heiser, HUD/FHA – Helena Field Office; Phone: 406.449.5050; Fax: 406.449.5052.


HUD Center for Faith-Based and Community Initiatives

In order to ensure that all eligible organizations are treated equally in the grant application process, HUD has made historic changes to its regulations. HUD is dedicated to ensuring that stakeholders inside and outside of HUD are well educated about the changes in regulations that allow faith-based groups to participate. There is no separate pot of money for the Faith-Based and Community Initiative. The key to the initiative is to provide access for faith-based and community groups to apply for federal grants or grants from entitlement communities. The intent of the program is to "level the playing field" so that all nonprofit groups, including faith-based groups, are treated equitably and fairly. The idea is to make federal grants "faith-friendly” but not to give a preference to faith-based groups. Note: Faith-based and community groups are "competing" for federal or local grants and must have the expertise and capacity to deliver the services or product for which the funding is intended. A Tool Kit for Montana Faith Based and Community Organizations is available at http://www.hud.gov/local/shared/working/r8/fbci/index.cfm?state=mt

Contact: Erik Amundson, U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development, Helena Field Office; Phone: 406.447.1488; Fax: 406.449.5052; website: http://www.hud.gov/energy/.


HOUSING DIVISION | MONTANA DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
301 S. PARK AVE, STE 240 | PO BOX 200528 | HELENA, MT 59620-0528 | P: (406) 841-2840 | F: (406) 841-2841 | TDD: (406) 841-2702 | TOLL FREE: (800) 761-6264